ASHS Press Releases

American Society for Horticultural Science

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Journal of ASHS

Common PGR Helps Creeping Bentgrass Weather Drought

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Trinexapac-ethyl proves effective during prolonged periods of drought stress

NEW BRUNSWICK, NJ—Irrigation water for turfgrass has become increasingly restricted due to environmental factors such as insufficient precipitation; increased domestic, agricultural, and industrial consumption; and contamination of potable water supplies. This water deficit has created an increased need to identify promising water conservation strategies and implement stringent restrictions in water use.

In their ongoing search for ways to improve turfgrass growth in environments where water is limited, scientists are searching for effective water saving practices by looking to factors that influence drought resistance. Discovering which turfgrasses respond favorably to these practices can assist turfgrass management professionals in their selection of water-saving species or cultivars and provide valuable information to the burgeoning turfgrass industry.

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Understanding Apples' Ancestors

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Scientists capture genetic diversity of wild Malus orientalis

Researchers study wild Malus orientalis in the Caucasus region.FORT COLLINS, CO—Wild Malus orientalis—species of wild apples that could be an ancestor of today’s domesticated apples—are native to the Middle East and Central Asia. A new study comparing the diversity of recently acquired M. orientalis varieties from Georgia and Armenia with previously collected varieties originating in Russia and Turkey narrows the large population and establishes a core collection that will make M. orientalis more accessible to the breeding and research communities.

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Sun or Shade: Pecan Leaves' Photosynthetic Light Response Evaluated

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New study provides vital information for commercial pecan operations

pecan fruitCOLLEGE STATION, TX—Pecan, the most valuable nut tree native to North America, is native from northern Illinois and southeastern Iowa to the Gulf Coast of the United States, where it grows abundantly along the Mississippi River, the rivers of central and eastern Oklahoma, and Texas. Popularity and consumer demand for pecans has increased the cultivation of pecan trees to other areas, while commercial production has expanded into many regions of the United States and Mexico.

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Study of Alternate Bearing Presents Recommendations for Citrus Growers

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In ‘Pixie’ mandarin, fruit reduces number of flowers of return bloom by inhibiting budbreak

'Pixie' mandarinRIVERSIDE, CA – Alternate bearing (also called biennial or uneven bearing) is the tendency of fruit trees to produce a heavy crop one year (called “on-crop”) followed by a light crop or no crop the following “off-crop” year. On-crop trees produce a large number of small fruit of little commercial value, while off-crop trees produce a small number of large fruit—a high proportion of which are culled in packinghouses due to their unattractive, thick rinds. The phenomenon is widespread and can occur in an entire region, in individual trees, part of a tree, or even on one branch.

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Protecting Fresh-Cut Produce

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Preharvest application of harpin increases antioxidants, prevents contamination

YUMA, AZ—The convenience of fresh-cut produce, which includes packaged lettuces, has greatly increased sales despite multiple foodborne outbreaks associated with these products. To reduce these risks, strict hygiene programs and sanitizers are used for decontamination once the food is harvested.  Preventing microbial contamination in the fields is equally important. Researchers from three institutions (Rutgers University, University of California, Davis and University of Arizona), lead by Jorge M. Fonseca at the University of Arizona’s Yuma Agricultural Center, experimented with the use of harpin, a substance known to boost plants’ resistance to disease, prior to harvest. Their findings, published in the Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, support the need to treat produce.

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New and Improved Tomato Analyzer

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Software proves versatile, accurate for measuring fruit shape and size

Tomao AnalyzerWOOSTER, OH—Tomatoes come in a variety of sizes and shapes, making them the perfect subject to test shape-analyzing software. The Tomato Analyzer is “rapidly becoming the standard for fruit morphological characterizations,” according to a study led by Marin Talbot Brewer of The Ohio State University’s Department of Horticulture and Crop Science. Details of the team’s latest Tomato Analyzer research were published in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science.

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