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American Society for Horticultural Science

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"Pillar" peach varieties contribute to yield, economic value in high-density systems

Long-term Effects of Peach Production Systems EvaluatedA research study evaluated the interactions of pruning strategies, groundcover management, tree densities, and peach architecture combined in eight peach production systems on crop yield and economic value. The results showed that the use of sod management reduced pruning time and costs, but the reduction of crop load reduced net return. High-density plantings in large vegetation-free areas had greater economic return than low-density plantings.

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Results show high tunnels can improve lettuce quality, yield

Three Diverse Microclimates Used in Study of Organic Lettuce Production SystemsField studies were conducted in diverse climates to compare high tunnel and open-field organic production systems for lettuce yield and quality. Experiments in Texas, Tennessee, and Washington found that high tunnels could be effective for protecting lettuce from severe or adverse weather at all three locations. The study suggests that high tunnels may be particularly advantageous in warmer climates to provide protection from the high winds and blowing dust common during spring growing seasons.

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Treated water from artificial wetlands inhibits root rot in tomato plants

Three nutrient solutions made with artificial wetlands effluents were compared with a control solution to investigate the effects of treated waters on development of a common pathogen on tomato root. Growth of Pythium ultimum was significantly inhibited by the treated water compared to the untreated water; however, root growth was adversely affected by treated water. Findings suggest that greenhouses should blend artificial wetlands water with fresh water to reduce mineral accumulation and maintain nutrient balance.

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Correlation between "perceived restorative potential", personal preference determined

Researchers investigated the relationship between Perceived Restorative Potential (PRP) and "preference" for an environment with respect to restorative components in two landscape categories: urban built landscapes and urban natural landscapes. The study found a moderate correlation between PRP and preference between urban built and urban natural landscapes and defined two constructs (preference and PRP) that can be used as a guide in designing and planning restorative landscapes.

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