ASHS Press Releases

American Society for Horticultural Science

  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size
Home HortScience
HortScience
E-mail Print

Plant size and light found most important in predicting daily water use

A study using greenhouse-grown petunias found that plant size and light are the most important factors affecting daily water usage (DWU) by plants. Researchers discovered that daily light integral is the most important environmental factor affecting DWU. A quantitative model developed during the study provides guidelines for accurate watering of greenhouse plants and may improve irrigation scheduling and reduce water consumption.

Read more...
 
E-mail Print

Three potential fungicides show "no advantage" over standard programs

Alternative Organic Fungicides Don’t Measure Up for Apple Scab ManagementA study compared the efficacy of three potential alternative fungicides (potassium bicarbonate, neem oil, and Bacillus subtilis) with the standard organic sulfur/lime-sulfur (SLS) fungicide program and a non-treated control for management of apple scab. Results showed that the alternative fungicides did not offer advantages over the standard SLS fungicide program in organic apple production, and in some cases had distinct disadvantages in terms of non-target impacts.

Read more...
 
E-mail Print

Genetic materials show potential as breeding cultivars for water-stressed regions

A study of 820 accessions of USDA’s Citrullus PIs and 246 watermelon breeding lines were evaluated for their drought tolerance at the seedling stage under extreme water stress conditions in a greenhouse. Twenty-five accessions were identified as the potential sources of tolerance to drought. The study recommended that the accessions with the highest or moderate drought tolerance could be used as genetic sources to develop watermelon rootstocks or cultivars for drought tolerance.

Read more...
 
E-mail Print

Rocky Mountain juniper’s oil content and composition vary with seasons, tree gender

Scientists evaluated Rocky Mountain juniper trees for changes in year-round essential oil content and composition. They found that the concentration of essential oil in fresh leaves varied, and that oil content in the male tree was greater than that of the female tree at most sampling points, thus demonstrating that both content and composition of essential oil from Rocky Mountain juniper are subject to seasonal changes and also depend on the sex of the tree.

Read more...
 


Page 9 of 56

Syndicate

feed-image Feed Entries